• Elaina Simpson, C.S.

Overcoming the temptation to compare


The so-called "liar" likes to suggest itself in making comparisons-- To make the challenge feel more personal and real.

To refute this whole idea, we can start with God. What God is, what God does. It's always helpful to go straight to God in prayer--

"God is like Himself and like nothing else. He is universal and primitive. His character admits of no degrees of comparison. God is not part, but the whole." (Mis. 102:12–14 (to 2nd .))


If God is incapable of making comparisons, isn't that also what's true for His/Her direct image, likeness and reflection?

Letting go of the temptation to compare gives us a higher sense of a freedom from discouragement, or self-focused thinking. It also removes the distraction of worrying about what's happening 'over there' so that we can focus on what's right here.

Not only that, but this keeps thought away from the false belief of vanity.

Mary Baker Eddy quotes Shakesphere in her writing titled "VAINGLORY." Which, is another word for vanity.

"'Comparisons are odorous.' — Shakespeare"

Mrs. Eddy comments-- "Two personal queries give point to human action: Who shall be greatest? and, Who shall be best? Earthly glory is vain; but not vain enough to attempt pointing the way to heaven, the harmony of being." (Mis. 267:14–15; 268:3–6)

She ends with this quote from the Bible:

“He that glorieth, let him glory in the Lord.” (Mis. 267:14–15; 268:3–6; 270:26)


A friend from Oregon shared an idea on how she prayed about feeling "less than." She realized that like a jig-saw puzzel, each piece is unique-- but needed. Without 1 piece, it ruins the whole puzzel.

Similarly, this is true with flowers. No flower looks at another flower and wonders why it isn't growing and isn't beautiful. Our true nature is actually above animalistic threats, competition and comparisons. Mary Baker Eddy writes in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, "The notion that animal natures can possibly give force to character is too absurd for consideration..."(SH 67:18–23)

Like the flower, it's natural to just beauitfully grow, shine and express.

Doing this, aids in healing. It helps us see what we are, instead of what we are not. Thought is then on Good, rather than lack. If we see Good in another, that's of course a promise that we can see it in ourselves.